MINSKISH
Not much to see here. But that other guy, you know,THAT GUY.
MINSKISH
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milkmadeicecream:

During prolonged periods of gray skies and sub-freezing temperatures here in New York City, we can’t help but start daydreaming about summer. We crank the summer jams, close the windows to our furnace-like apartments, and, of course, start our summer flavor experiments.To abet this endeavor, we called upon The Orchard, the gourmet fruitery out in Midwood, Brooklyn. It’s a small place, but stocks fruit from all over the world. We picked up some mangos, mangosteens, passion fruit, UGLI fruit, and popcorn clementines, for starters. Stay tuned to see what we come up with!
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teamfytbl:

Cayenne | Source | More
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haven’t earned her. yet.
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1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle.
But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon?
In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1.
We still want to keep using the angle from the x-axis as the function’s input, instead of the distance along the polygon’s boundary. (These are only the same value for the circle!) This is why the square does not trace a straight diagonal line, as you may expect, but a segment of the tangent function. In other words, the speed of the dot around the polygon is not constant anymore.
Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon.
More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post
Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like.
This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance
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Chicks love geeks who love whiskey. 
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teamfytbl:

F12 Berlinetta | Source | More
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affluence-de-la-vie:

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